Do you want famine or feast?

Do you want famine or feast?

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

Imagine you’re ravenous — and someone brings you plates of your two favourite dishes. You like them equally and both are the same distance away on the table. Which do you choose — or is there a very real risk you’ll starve because you just can’t make up your mind?

This may seem like a bizarre scenario. But there’s a business parallel that I’ll explore in a moment.

As for the dilemma itself, it’s one that philosophers have been chewing over since the 14th century. The quandary was dubbed “Buridan’s ass” which — let us assure you — has more to do with donkeys than derrières.

The scene goes like this … a donkey is equally hungry and thirsty but finds itself precisely midway between a stack of hay and a bucket of water. The paradox suggests the animal will die of hunger and thirst because it cannot make a rational decision to choose one over the other.

 

So what’s the business message?

At this point, we need to think about another animal … the elephant in the room.

We’re talking about a recent event, not seen in generations. A head-to-head contest, with a narrow victory.

Something that left a country shocked and divided, raising all sorts of questions.

As we’re sure you realise, we’re talking about Germany’s victory against Italy in the Euro 2016 quarter finals …

Seriously though, we do mean Brexit.

For Italian businesses with operations in the UK, or wanting to expand in the UK, a dilemma exists.

 

Put simply, companies face two options after the referendum:

1) Should we invest, seeing Brexit as an opportunity?

2) Or, should we baton down the hatches, make cutbacks and anticipate a downturn?

In this very real scenario, it’s possible to feel paralysed — not by hunger — but by fear and uncertainty. The danger is, companies end up doing nothing at all, lose direction and waste years, while their competitors drive forwards. To me, that seems the worst decision of all.

 

We don’t have a crystal ball but …

Every company’s challenge will be unique. Yet there are two guiding principles that will help businesses to chart these uncertain waters. And both of these point towards the growth option.

Firstly, the UK government is taking positive steps to encourage business. It’s backing a fall in Company Tax from today’s 20% to 17% in 2020 — with the suggestion of a further reduction to 15%. Meanwhile, significant government support for innovation and entrepreneurship is arriving to drive growth and economic diversification. The UKTI, Mayor of London and others are getting involved. If incentives appear, don’t miss out.

Secondly, the unstoppable march towards pay-as-you-go services for everything from staffing, to vehicles, offices and virtually all IT and support, make it easy for companies to grow without risking huge amounts of capital. Switching to these business models will help you to focus on what you’re best at and what’s most profitable.

We’ve got to mention the pound too, although currency markets are always volatile. Any fall in the value of the pound also throws up interesting possibilities. Investment coming into the UK from overseas will stretch further and exports from the UK will be cheaper.

Overall, we’re advising companies to invest carefully — rather than cut back. But do it in a flexible, focused way. What’s essential is that enterprises don’t end up like Buridan’s ass and simply perish because they cannot make up their minds. During times of dramatic change, doing nothing can have fatal consequences.

Talk to us about your growth ambitions and we’ll explore the best way ahead.

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

Do you want famine or feast?

Do you want famine or feast?

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

Imagine you’re ravenous — and someone brings you plates of your two favourite dishes. You like them equally and both are the same distance away on the table. Which do you choose — or is there a very real risk you’ll starve because you just can’t make up your mind?

This may seem like a bizarre scenario. But there’s a business parallel that I’ll explore in a moment.

As for the dilemma itself, it’s one that philosophers have been chewing over since the 14th century. The quandary was dubbed “Buridan’s ass” which — let us assure you — has more to do with donkeys than derrières.

The scene goes like this … a donkey is equally hungry and thirsty but finds itself precisely midway between a stack of hay and a bucket of water. The paradox suggests the animal will die of hunger and thirst because it cannot make a rational decision to choose one over the other.

 

So what’s the business message?

At this point, we need to think about another animal … the elephant in the room.

We’re talking about a recent event, not seen in generations. A head-to-head contest, with a narrow victory. Something that left a country shocked and divided, raising all sorts of questions. As we’re sure you realise, we’re talking about the BBC losing out to Channel 4 over the signing of the Great British Bake-Off …

Seriously though, we do mean Brexit. For UK businesses, the country’s decision to leave the EU creates a major dilemma.

 

Put simply, companies face two options after the referendum:

1) Should we invest, seeing Brexit as an opportunity?

2) Or, should we baton down the hatches, make cutbacks and anticipate a downturn?

In this very real scenario, it’s possible to feel paralysed — not by hunger — but by fear and uncertainty. The danger is, companies end up doing nothing at all, lose direction and waste years, while their competitors drive forwards. To me, that seems the worst decision of all.

 

We don’t have a crystal ball but …

Every company’s challenge will be unique. Yet there are two guiding principles that will help businesses to chart these uncertain waters. And both of these point towards the growth option.

Firstly, the UK government is taking positive steps to encourage business. It’s backing a fall in Company Tax from today’s 20% to 17% in 2020 — with the suggestion of a further reduction to 15%. Meanwhile, significant government support for innovation and entrepreneurship is arriving to drive growth and economic diversification. The UKTI, Mayor of London and others are getting involved. If incentives appear, don’t miss out.

Secondly, the unstoppable march towards pay-as-you-go services for everything from staffing, to vehicles, offices and virtually all IT and support, make it easy for companies to grow without risking huge amounts of capital. Switching to these business models will help you to focus on what you’re best at and what’s most profitable.

We’ve got to mention the pound too, although currency markets are always volatile. Any fall in the value of the pound also throws up interesting possibilities. Investment coming into the UK from overseas will stretch further and exports from the UK will be cheaper.

Overall, we’re advising companies to invest carefully — rather than cut back. But do it in a flexible, focused way. What’s essential is that enterprises don’t end up like Buridan’s ass and simply perish because they cannot make up their minds. During times of dramatic change, doing nothing can have fatal consequences.

Talk to us about your growth ambitions and we’ll explore the best way ahead.

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

How to beat the crowdfunding blues

How to beat the crowdfunding blues

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

How can you put the ‘fun’ back into crowdfunding or, more to the point, the millions of missing micro investors needed to make it work? Recent problems have dampened this fledgling financial marketplace. But small firms needing cash shouldn’t despair.

 

A few years ago, crowdfunding was seen as a ray of hope after the world-wide financial crisis. Why look to the banks — if masses of micro investors are queuing up to help, each waving £10 in your direction? People liked the concept and a number of equity crowdfunding platforms were launched and scaled up.

But then came disillusion

Just recently I attended a CSFI (Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation) roundtable called ‘Fin-Tech for Breakfast’. It touched on several interesting topics such as regulatory developments, payments, digital banking, blockchain and P2P. But then we couldn’t avoid discussing the industry shockwaves emanating from LendingClub.

I won’t cast any judgment or go into the details, aside from saying it’s been reported that sales to a single investor of $22 million in near-prime loans failed to meet that investor’s terms (you can read the full story here). At our roundtable, someone commented that this made LendingClub look more like a non-bank lender rather than a loans marketplace.

This made me think about the broader crowdfunding industry, within which I worked at Code Investing, and which I have had the pleasure to discuss at The Pluralists Club. The question I’m asking myself is: does the ‘crowd’ in ‘crowdfunding’ really exist in this sector today?

What’s changed?

After the initial optimism and excitement, it’s clear that the crowdfunding industry is consolidating and making adjustments:

  • The demand for funding is definitely there, but what about the supply? In most cases there are a few large investors (usually angel investors) providing most of the funding.
  • Small and medium-sized investors exist but probably not in large enough numbers for these platforms to scale up. And stories like LendingClub won’t help.
  • Some platforms are branding and repositioning themselves almost as niche investors’ clubs. We are seeing now the first exits.

With these things in mind, the crowdfunding arena could be shrouded in gloom for some time to come. And in the unpredictable Brexit era, investors of all sizes may be looking for safer, more traditional investments in the short-term at least.

Crowdfunding isn’t gone for good

Even though crowdfunding has taken some knocks, it’s still a valid business model.

As long as interest rates are low and other investment opportunities remain uncertain, then a compelling crowdfunding deal can be just as good (if not better) than anything else you’ll see — and will attract investors of all sizes.

But the bar has been raised.

And that means that any small businesses venturing into the world of crowdfunding need to up their game. Here are three suggestions:

  • Stand out from the crowd: Present your core proposition in a bolder way. Find a business expansion expert with a technology/finance background who will help you to cut through crowds of cash-strapped companies.
  • Don’t be afraid to re-price and re-package your services: A trusted outside adviser may have a better idea of who you’re competing against – and how to give you an edge, so you can push your way to the front.
  • Show you’ve got investors already: Mobilise family, friends and other contacts to raise you up on their shoulders — and boost your crowdfunding chances. Hit the magic 30% funded mark from these people and you might find that’s the tipping point that gives you traction with other investors.

But if that all doesn’t go to plan, then there are other financial backers out there. And you don’t have to go all the way back to the bank. We haven’t gone full circle!

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

How to beat the crowdfunding blues

How to beat the crowdfunding blues

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

How can you put the ‘fun’ back into crowdfunding or, more to the point, the millions of missing micro investors needed to make it work? Recent problems have dampened this fledgling financial marketplace. But small firms needing cash shouldn’t despair.

 

A few years ago, crowdfunding was seen as a ray of hope after the world-wide financial crisis. Why look to the banks — if masses of micro investors are queuing up to help, each waving £10 in your direction? People liked the concept and a number of equity crowdfunding platforms were launched and scaled up.

But then came disillusion

Just recently I attended a CSFI (Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation) roundtable called ‘Fin-Tech for Breakfast’. It touched on several interesting topics such as regulatory developments, payments, digital banking, blockchain and P2P. But then we couldn’t avoid discussing the industry shockwaves emanating from LendingClub.

I won’t cast any judgment or go into the details, aside from saying it’s been reported that sales to a single investor of $22 million in near-prime loans failed to meet that investor’s terms (you can read the full story here). At our roundtable, someone commented that this made LendingClub look more like a non-bank lender rather than a loans marketplace.

This made me think about the broader crowdfunding industry, within which I worked at Code Investing, and which I have had the pleasure to discuss at The Pluralists Club. The question I’m asking myself is: does the ‘crowd’ in ‘crowdfunding’ really exist in this sector today?

What’s changed?

After the initial optimism and excitement, it’s clear that the crowdfunding industry is consolidating and making adjustments:

  • The demand for funding is definitely there, but what about the supply? In most cases there are a few large investors (usually angel investors) providing most of the funding.
  • Small and medium-sized investors exist but probably not in large enough numbers for these platforms to scale up. And stories like LendingClub won’t help.
  • Some platforms are branding and repositioning themselves almost as niche investors’ clubs. We are seeing now the first exits.

With these things in mind, the crowdfunding arena could be shrouded in gloom for some time to come. And in the unpredictable Brexit era, investors of all sizes may be looking for safer, more traditional investments in the short-term at least.

Crowdfunding isn’t gone for good

Even though crowdfunding has taken some knocks, it’s still a valid business model.

As long as interest rates are low and other investment opportunities remain uncertain, then a compelling crowdfunding deal can be just as good (if not better) than anything else you’ll see — and will attract investors of all sizes.

But the bar has been raised.

And that means that any small businesses venturing into the world of crowdfunding need to up their game. Here are three suggestions:

  • Stand out from the crowd: Present your core proposition in a bolder way. Find a business expansion expert with a technology/finance background who will help you to cut through crowds of cash-strapped companies.
  • Don’t be afraid to re-price and re-package your services: A trusted outside adviser may have a better idea of who you’re competing against – and how to give you an edge, so you can push your way to the front.
  • Show you’ve got investors already: Mobilise family, friends and other contacts to raise you up on their shoulders — and boost your crowdfunding chances. Hit the magic 30% funded mark from these people and you might find that’s the tipping point that gives you traction with other investors.

But if that all doesn’t go to plan, then there are other financial backers out there. And you don’t have to go all the way back to the bank. We haven’t gone full circle!

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

What’s the secret sauce for business growth?

What’s the secret sauce for business growth?

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

Sooner or later, most small or medium-sized companies reach a major crossroads. Business has been good in previous years — but how do you take things to the next level? Is there one change you can make to guarantee successful growth?

I’ve worked with firms across Europe in different sectors, from manufacturing to maritime, IT to financial services. Some companies were historic family businesses, while others were maturing companies or ambitious start-ups.

Each grew. Some spectacularly. But the answer wasn’t one thing, it was four things, which I call the key ingredients for growth.

Ingredient #1: How you bring products to market
Some companies had successful products or services. New ones were being launched. But what looked exciting at the ‘engineering’ stage failed to translate into sales. The breakthrough came when we adapted the proposition. In many cases, we turned dry product features into mouth-watering product benefits that connected with customer needs. The marketing spark returned, the audience ‘got it’ and sales lit up.

Ingredient #2: How customers do business with you
Sometimes you’re so close to your own business, so familiar with its quirks and nuances, that you don’t realise how ‘doing business’ feels from the customers’ perspective. But what if there’s something going wrong at the process level and you’re missing it? Most times, it takes someone from the outside to see what’s going adrift in the customer journey — and help you fix it.

Ingredient #3: How you track and report key information
Do you want customers to tell you when problems exist — or do you want to fix them before anyone notices? Placing key performance indicators at strategic points across your business will tell you where today’s logjams and other issues need attention. This can be the secret to unlocking productivity, being able to scale up rapidly, and where to spend most effectively.

Ingredient #4: Refreshing your vision and team
Most of my clients’ success has been due to the talent of their people. But sometimes a great team starts to misfire, people clash and effort is wasted. The answer is to refresh your company vision, mission and values — turning this into objectives, deadlines and priorities. Then get everyone to align behind your common goal, so they can move ahead confidently. If they refuse, then maybe your company isn’t the best place for them — and a few new faces could improve everything?

Oops. We missed something.
What I’ve described might sound like a shopping list for growth success. But you probably need a business expansion expert (rather like a chef!) to add more some ingredients and less of others — and then to mix them into a winning recipe!

Finally, there’s one extra ingredient we haven’t mentioned. And nobody can have it but you. It’s whether you have the right mindset to grow. Are you ready for change — and do you have the drive and determination to see it through? Only then will your vision take shape.

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you enjoyed this post.

What’s the secret sauce for business growth?

What’s the secret sauce for business growth?

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

Sooner or later, most small or medium-sized companies reach a major crossroads. Business has been good in previous years — but how do you take things to the next level? Is there one change you can make to guarantee successful growth?

I’ve worked with firms across Europe in different sectors, from manufacturing to maritime, IT to financial services. Some companies were historic family businesses, while others were maturing companies or ambitious start-ups.

Each grew. Some spectacularly. But the answer wasn’t one thing, it was four things, which I call the key ingredients for growth.

Ingredient #1: How you bring products to market
Some companies had successful products or services. New ones were being launched. But what looked exciting at the ‘engineering’ stage failed to translate into sales. The breakthrough came when we adapted the proposition. In many cases, we turned dry product features into mouth-watering product benefits that connected with customer needs. The marketing spark returned, the audience ‘got it’ and sales lit up.

Ingredient #2: How customers do business with you
Sometimes you’re so close to your own business, so familiar with its quirks and nuances, that you don’t realise how ‘doing business’ feels from the customers’ perspective. But what if there’s something going wrong at the process level and you’re missing it? Most times, it takes someone from the outside to see what’s going adrift in the customer journey — and help you fix it.

Ingredient #3: How you track and report key information
Do you want customers to tell you when problems exist — or do you want to fix them before anyone notices? Placing key performance indicators at strategic points across your business will tell you where today’s logjams and other issues need attention. This can be the secret to unlocking productivity, being able to scale up rapidly, and where to spend most effectively.

Ingredient #4: Refreshing your vision and team
Most of my clients’ success has been due to the talent of their people. But sometimes a great team starts to misfire, people clash and effort is wasted. The answer is to refresh your company vision, mission and values — turning this into objectives, deadlines and priorities. Then get everyone to align behind your common goal, so they can move ahead confidently. If they refuse, then maybe your company isn’t the best place for them — and a few new faces could improve everything?

Oops. We missed something.
What I’ve described might sound like a shopping list for growth success. But you probably need a business expansion expert (rather like a chef!) to add more some ingredients and less of others — and then to mix them into a winning recipe!

Finally, there’s one extra ingredient we haven’t mentioned. And nobody can have it but you. It’s whether you have the right mindset to grow. Are you ready for change — and do you have the drive and determination to see it through? Only then will your vision take shape.

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you enjoyed this post.

Three things IoT must do to get beyond the hype

Three things IoT must do to get beyond the hype

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

How many times have you heard that the Internet of Things (IoT) is going to be epic – with billions of connected devices generating trillions of dollars? And yet, the overwhelming reaction of tech consumers right now is essentially “meh”.

Just recently, I moderated a roundtable discussion at the Milan Disruptive Week, on the subject of “Investing in IoT”. We talked about emerging sectors, key success factors and open innovation strategies. But it was my three-year-old daughter that got me involved with IoT on a personal level.

This wasn’t because she’s a genius (though I like to think she is) but because we bought a baby monitor for her. I then discovered the manufacturer, Withings, has been acquired by Nokia as part of its strategy to consolidate its position in the IoT industry. So now I can “live the dream” of IoT next time my little girl wakes at 2am.

Read the full article here.

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you enjoyed this post.

Three things IoT must do to get beyond the hype

Three things IoT must do to get beyond the hype

How many times have you heard that the Internet of Things (IoT) is going to be epic – with billions of connected devices generating trillions of dollars? And yet, the overwhelming reaction of tech consumers right now is essentially “meh”.

Just recently, I moderated a roundtable discussion at the Milan Disruptive Week, on the subject of “Investing in IoT”. We talked about emerging sectors, key success factors and open innovation strategies. But it was my three-year-old daughter that got me involved with IoT on a personal level.

This wasn’t because she’s a genius (though I like to think she is) but because we bought a baby monitor for her. I then discovered the manufacturer, Withings, has been acquired by Nokia as part of its strategy to consolidate its position in the IoT industry. So now I can “live the dream” of IoT next time my little girl wakes at 2am.

Read the full article here.

Big versus Small: Which is better?

Big versus Small: Which is better?

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

Towards the end of last year, I was invited to FT Innovate, a flagship event organised by FT Live, the global events arm of the Financial Times.

It was an intense two days of presentations, meetings and discussions. I met many interesting people and attended a dinner with the founder of Evernote and the CIO of Eurostar. I also joined a debate hosted by TableCrowd.

The buzz was around ‘Big vs. Small: which one is better?’ For me, this is always a hot topic, because I left the corporate world to focus on growth strategy for SMEs.

The debate was all around how companies of any size generate, propagate and scale innovation. Some familiar themes emerged …

Big companies have the availability of resources, but they face the pressure of the quarterly results, and innovation can sometimes be stifled by corporate processes. In contrast, small companies can engage with great new ideas more easily, but struggle with getting expertise and how to scale up without sizeable investment.

It was a good discussion. But I felt we had missed something.

Afterwards, I wondered: Are we simply accepting the traditional ‘rules’ of the game? If you win in one way, do you automatically lose in another? And what about the medium-sized companies? Are they forever doomed to be caught in the middle – beaten by the smalls or eaten by the bigs?

If you were a small company with big ambitions, how could you go about growth in a better way? Is it possible to get the best of all worlds?

I think the answer is ‘Yes’ if you take a step back and consider three simple truths.

Truth #1: Success isn’t measured by what you own physically

Unless people have a burning ambition to build an empire, then success shouldn’t be about size in terms of buildings, people or even product ranges. Success should be about growing, profitable revenue.

In effect, you could be small business – let’s say 10 people – and be astonishingly profitable without needing to add to your headcount or invest much at all in new equipment.

Truth #2: Success is often linked to being very good at one thing

Can you sum up what makes your business special in just a few words?

It’s much better to do one thing exceptionally well, rather than being a mile wide and an inch deep. Often it’s helpful to get some outside expertise to help capture your USP (unique selling point) – and revisit this from time to time. Otherwise, it’s very easy to lose focus and drift when you start to grow. Staying fairly small – in terms of your core team – can keep you focused on what you do best.

Truth #3: Other people are willing to handle 99% of the cost and risk of investing

Cash-flow is the lifeblood of smaller companies. But as you start to grow, there’s the temptation to start owning things and employing lots of people on permanent contracts. Then you need a lease on a larger premises, bigger insurance, HR people, lots of IT and much more. This might feel good at first. But, in reality, you’re narrowing your options for the future and increasing your liabilities.

Today, virtually every kind of service can be purchased on a pay-as-you-go basis. And the list seems to be getting longer: office space, cars, people, telephony, IT hardware, software, hosted services, videoconferencing and more. Simply let other people invest in these things and make them brilliant. Just pick the best of them rather than try to create or own them. Then simply only pay for what you use, month by month, scaling up and down easily. That’s optimum efficiency.

What will the small-big company of the future look like?

In the extreme, I suppose it might look like a large company in marketing and financial terms – a brand with a massive turnover, recognised within every home and business.

But behind the logo, there might simply be a handful of innovators and their intellectual property. They might not even own a desk between them. If they want to change direction by 180-degrees, they can – or they might set up other ‘small-big’ businesses on the side (which entrepreneurs love to do).

As a result, they combine that ‘small company’ innovative spirit and agility with those ‘big company’ resources and scalability.

What do you think?

Please post your comments below. I’d love to hear about them.

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you enjoyed this post.

Big versus Small: Which is better?

Big versus Small: Which is better?

Note: sign up to our newsletter here if you like this post.

 

Towards the end of last year, I was invited to FT Innovate, a flagship event organised by FT Live, the global events arm of the Financial Times.

It was an intense two days of presentations, meetings and discussions. I met many interesting people and attended a dinner with the founder of Evernote and the CIO of Eurostar. I also joined a debate hosted by TableCrowd.

The buzz was around ‘Big vs. Small: which one is better?’ For me, this is always a hot topic, because I left the corporate world to focus on growth strategy for SMEs.

The debate was all around how companies of any size generate, propagate and scale innovation. Some familiar themes emerged …

Big companies have the availability of resources, but they face the pressure of the quarterly results, and innovation can sometimes be stifled by corporate processes. In contrast, small companies can engage with great new ideas more easily, but struggle with getting expertise and how to scale up without sizeable investment.

It was a good discussion. But I felt we had missed something.

Afterwards, I wondered: Are we simply accepting the traditional ‘rules’ of the game? If you win in one way, do you automatically lose in another? And what about the medium-sized companies? Are they forever doomed to be caught in the middle – beaten by the smalls or eaten by the bigs?

If you were a small company with big ambitions, how could you go about growth in a better way? Is it possible to get the best of all worlds?

I think the answer is ‘Yes’ if you take a step back and consider three simple truths.

Truth #1: Success isn’t measured by what you own physically

Unless people have a burning ambition to build an empire, then success shouldn’t be about size in terms of buildings, people or even product ranges. Success should be about growing, profitable revenue.

In effect, you could be small business – let’s say 10 people – and be astonishingly profitable without needing to add to your headcount or invest much at all in new equipment.

Truth #2: Success is often linked to being very good at one thing

Can you sum up what makes your business special in just a few words?

It’s much better to do one thing exceptionally well, rather than being a mile wide and an inch deep. Often it’s helpful to get some outside expertise to help capture your USP (unique selling point) – and revisit this from time to time. Otherwise, it’s very easy to lose focus and drift when you start to grow. Staying fairly small – in terms of your core team – can keep you focused on what you do best.

Truth #3: Other people are willing to handle 99% of the cost and risk of investing

Cash-flow is the lifeblood of smaller companies. But as you start to grow, there’s the temptation to start owning things and employing lots of people on permanent contracts. Then you need a lease on a larger premises, bigger insurance, HR people, lots of IT and much more. This might feel good at first. But, in reality, you’re narrowing your options for the future and increasing your liabilities.

Today, virtually every kind of service can be purchased on a pay-as-you-go basis. And the list seems to be getting longer: office space, cars, people, telephony, IT hardware, software, hosted services, videoconferencing and more. Simply let other people invest in these things and make them brilliant. Just pick the best of them rather than try to create or own them. Then simply only pay for what you use, month by month, scaling up and down easily. That’s optimum efficiency.

What will the small-big company of the future look like?

In the extreme, I suppose it might look like a large company in marketing and financial terms – a brand with a massive turnover, recognised within every home and business.

But behind the logo, there might simply be a handful of innovators and their intellectual property. They might not even own a desk between them. If they want to change direction by 180-degrees, they can – or they might set up other ‘small-big’ businesses on the side (which entrepreneurs love to do).

As a result, they combine that ‘small company’ innovative spirit and agility with those ‘big company’ resources and scalability.

What do you think?

Please post your comments below. I’d love to hear about them.

 

Sign up to our newsletter here if you enjoyed this post.

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